Cape Wrath Trail – Day 12 – Tuesday 27th May – Inchnadamph to Glendhu bothy

We woke to blue skies, had a good breakfast in the Inchnadamph Hotel, packed our gear and headed off, turning right up the track past the hostel and then left to climb up another, smaller track marked by a cairn.  This climbed steadily up over the bealach, past Beinn Uidhe.

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We stopped briefly at the Lochan Fleodach Coire which is a lovely spot.  The weather was sunny and warm and although this was a tough day, the going is so much easier when its dry and you have the beautiful views to lift you.

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Lunch spot

Lochan Fleodach Coire

The path was great and it climbed up through the green patch between the scree at the top and then wound its way down the other side.

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At a junction by a cairn by a pretty lochan, surrounded by seat sized boulders, we stopped and had lunch. This was a  bouldery bit that was fairly sheltered.  We carried on and took the right path at the junction.  A few metres on, there was another cairned junction in the path where we took the fainter left path.  This turned out to be an excellent decision as the path got better and steadily led us down the steep slope towards the river below.  We had read reports of this part being tricky to get down with no path so we were quite glad.  It ran out eventually but it wasn’t too much of a descent by then to the river, that we easily crossed over on stones.

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The going was rough now and we tried to follow clear lines alongside the river as there was no path.  There were a few animal tracks and an old fence guided us.

We walked past the Eas a’Chual Aluinn waterfall, surprisingly the UK’s highest waterfall, though you’d never think it.

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We eventually picked up a path of sorts that led us round and over various headlands, until at last Glencoul bothy came into view.  It is attached to a larger, derelict house and was not the wee bothy type building that I first saw.

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It is a beautiful setting, overlooking Loch Glencoul.  We stopped here for a break before heading on for Glendhu.

Glencoul bothy

Glencoul bothy

The view from Glencoul bothy

The view from Glencoul bothy

The stunning setting of Glencoul.  The bothy is the little house attached to the big house on the right.

The stunning setting of Glencoul. The bothy is the little house attached to the big house on the right.

Views from Aird da Loch dominated by the lovely profile of Quinag

Views from Aird da Loch dominated by the lovely profile of Quinag

We walked past the wee building near the bothy, crossed the river (there is no longer a bridge but we managed to cross on stones), and turned right up the LR track as if heading towards Glencoul.  A tiny cairn, easily missed on the left, guided us left up the path that would take us over Aird da Loch to Glendhu.  This path was good, although I am sure it would be a lot rougher if the weather wasn’t as good.

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Soon Glendhu came into sight, but it was a frustrating sight because we had to go all the way down and round the headland to the other side of the water to reach it.

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We passed two women walking from Cape Wrath to Ullapool in the opposite direction so stopped to chat.  They had stayed the night in Glendhu and were heading to Glencoul to stay the night there.

Eventually we arrived at Glendhu – a lovely, well-kept bothy in a stunning, truly breathtaking location.  We performed our ‘personal admin’, getting gear organised and changing, and sat outside on the bench for a while, taking it all in.  There was some firewood left (thankfully, as there is a shortage of wood around here) and we had the place to ourselves.

Glendhu bothy

Glendhu bothy

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The magnificent view from Glendhu.  It was getting dark at this point.

The magnificent view from Glendhu. It was getting dark at this point.

This had been the best day weather-wise that we’d had so far.  Indeed it was also one of our favourite days – a great but tough, demanding walk that took us 9.5 hours, across beautiful, remote country and finishing in a great bothy.  We lit a fire, had tea and sat and had a few drams.  Bliss.

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